Public Safety

FCC’s Proposed Cybersecurity Regulation Fatally Flawed

Posted by | Broadband Internet, Cybersecurity, Public Safety | No Comments

For most people, the hardest part of their last few days on the job is finding the motivation to tie up loose ends before they leave. This should have been easy for the former chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), Tom Wheeler, who left the agency upon President Trump’s inauguration. After Trump’s election victory, congressional leadership advised Wheeler to focus his staff’s energies on consensus and administrative matters and to avoid complex or controversial issues.

Wheeler didn’t take their advice. Just two days before Trump’s inauguration, Wheeler’s FCC issued a white paper asserting that the agency (1) has jurisdiction to comprehensively regulate cybersecurity for commercial communications networks and (2) should regulate the cybersecurity practices of broadband internet service providers (ISPs) and other sectors of the communications industry.

The FCC’s report is not only complex and controversial, its key conclusions are wrong. Like the analysis in so many other items the Wheeler FCC issued, the report just presumes the agency has authority to do whatever it likes with regard to cybersecurity. It doesn’t. Congress has determined that the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is the appropriate forum for addressing cybersecurity, not the FCC.

The FCC’s view of the cybersecurity marketplace is also based on something other than reality. Compelling evidence shows that market forces are in fact incentivizing substantial investment in the deployment of cybersecurity protections without the FCC’s interference. Read More

Maximizing the Success of the Incentive Auction

Posted by | Public Safety, Wireless | 2 Comments

I prepared a report for the Expanding Opportunities for Broadcasters Coalition and Consumer Electronics Association entitled Maximizing the Success of the Incentive Auction, which was filed at the Federal Communications Commission on November 4, 2013. The executive summary is reprinted below and the full paper can be viewed here. Read More

FCC Commissioner Rosenworcel’s Speech on Spectrum Policy Reveals Intellectual Bankruptcy at DOJ

Posted by | Public Safety, Wireless | No Comments

This week at CTIA 2013, FCC Commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel presented ten ideas for spectrum policy. Though I don’t agree with all of them, she articulated a reasonable vision for spectrum policy that prioritizes consumer demand, incorporates market-oriented solutions, and establishes transparent goals and timelines. Commissioner Rosenworcel’s principled approach stands in stark contrast to the intellectually bankrupt incentive auction recommendation offered by the Department of Justice last month. Read More

DOJ Spectrum Plan Is Not Supported by Economic Theory or FCC Findings

Posted by | Public Safety, Wireless | One Comment

Frontline relied on the DOJ foreclosure theory to predict that the lack of eligibility restrictions in the 700 MHz auction would “inevitably” increase prices, stifle innovation, and reduce the diversity of service offerings as Verizon and AT&T warehoused the spectrum. In reality, the exact opposite occurred.

The DOJ recently recommended that the FCC rig the upcoming incentive auction to ensure Sprint Nextel and T-Mobile are winners and Verizon and AT&T are losers. I previously noted that the DOJ spectrum plan (1) inconsistent with its own findings in recent merger proceedings and the intent of Congress, (2) inherently discriminatory, and (3) irrational as applied. Additional analysis indicates that it isn’t supported by economic theory or FCC factual findings either. Read More

Is the FCC Seeking to Help Internet Consumers or Preserve Its Own Jurisdiction?

Posted by | Broadband Internet, Public Safety | 15 Comments

As the “real-world” continues its inexorable march toward our all-IP future, the FCC remains stuck in the mud fighting the regulatory wars of yesteryear, wielding its traditional weapon of bureaucratic delay to mask its own agenda.

Late last Friday the Technology Transitions Policy Task Force at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) issued a Public Notice proposing to trial three narrow issues related to the IP transition (the transition of 20th Century telephone systems to the native Internet networks of the 21st Century). Outgoing FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski says these “real-world trials [would] help accelerate the ongoing technology transitions moving us to modern broadband networks.” Though the proposed trials could prove useful, in the “real-world”, the Public Notice is more likely to discourage future investment in Internet infrastructure than to accelerate it. Read More

FCC and Commissioner Ajit Pai Work Through Hurricane Sandy

Posted by | Public Safety | No Comments

Federal offices in Washington, DC, were closed last Monday as Hurricane Sandy whipped its way through the region. Despite the formal shutdown, I expect employees in the FCC’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau worked 24 hours per day throughout the storm tracking the damage to our communications networks and providing emergency authorizations when necessary to restore service. Our first responders and those who support them are often the difference between life and death in a catastrophe.

The dedication and calm displayed by FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai on Monday was a testament to his personal resolve and a reminder of the bravery of FCC emergency personnel who report to work no matter the risk. Commissioner Pai had been scheduled to appear at 4G World in Chicago on Monday, but was unable to attend in person when his flight was canceled due to the storm.

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