2017 November

Statement On Racist Attacks On FCC Chairman Ajit Pai

Posted by | Broadband Internet, Net Neutrality Series 2.0 | No Comments

Washington, DC, November 27, 2017 – Fred Campbell, director of Tech Knowledge, issued the following statement regarding racist attacks against Ajit Pai, Chairman of the  Federal Communications Commission:

“The repeated racist attacks against FCC Chairman Ajit Pai and his family in their own home during the holiday weekend are horrific. The perpetrators of this villainy should be ashamed. These attacks aren’t net neutrality advocacy. They are terrorism.”

http://tagthecat.com.au/portfolio-category/featured/ http://reenajbhambra.com/?feed=rss2 Tech Knowledge promotes market-oriented technology policies on behalf of the public interest. Additional information about Tech Knowledge can be found on our website, buy dramamine for kids techknowledge.center.

Statement On FCC Plan To Undo Obama’s Net Neutrality Rules

Posted by | Broadband Internet, Freedom of Speech, Net Neutrality Series 2.0 | 5 Comments

Washington, DC, November 21, 2017 – Fred Campbell, director of Tech Knowledge, issued the following statement regarding the Federal Communications Commission’s plan to undo the Obama administration’s net neutrality rules:

“Tech Knowledge welcomes the FCC’s open and transparent effort to repeal the last administration’s unconstitutional net neutrality rules. In the absence of a market failure, the constitution doesn’t permit the FCC to treat the information superhighway or any other institution of the press like a public utility. This foundational principle of our system of government must be restored.”

http://ripplpainting.com/power-washing/"http:/ripplpainting.com/" Tech Knowledge promotes market-oriented technology policies on behalf of the public interest. Additional information about Tech Knowledge can be found on our website, techknowledge.center.

Case Against AT&T-Time Warner Merger Is Weak

Posted by | Antitrust | One Comment

Antitrust and media experts were surprised last week when the Department of Justice (DOJ) leaked its staff’s opposition to the AT&T-Time Warner merger. The surprise is summed up by Ed Lee, managing editor at Recode, who told CNBC that AT&T “has a slam dunk court case” against the Justice Department. If the agency decides to pursue staff’s recommendation, it’s likely to lose in federal court and the court of public opinion.

Most antitrust challenges involve mergers between companies that serve the same customers (“horizontal” mergers), like Walgreens’ attempt to acquire Rite Aid, because horizontal mergers eliminate a competitive choice from the marketplace. The AT&T-Time Warner deal is a “vertical” merger of companies who don’t serve the same set of customers — Time Warner creates programming to sell to distributors and AT&T distributes programming to consumers.

Challenges to vertical mergers are rare because the number of competitive choices for each set of customers remains the same. To successfully challenge this vertical merger, DOJ would need to show that the combined company would have sufficient market power to foreclose rival video distributors from accessing Time Warner content or rival programmers from accessing AT&T’s distribution network. Precedent, economic theory, and empirical evidence make it unlikely that the DOJ could prove the combined company would have sufficient market power to engage in either foreclosure strategy. Read More